Posts by DEC

:) Ask "the only thing i click more than my mouse, is my shutter release"

A few links, and thoughts…

Forked this Access Management project for use with our projects.

https://github.com/digitalmystic/OpenAM (GITHub)

http://med.stanford.edu/news/all-news/2019/05/synthetic-biology-used-to-target-cancer-cells.html


https://medium.com/@ngoeke/how-to-identify-your-true-friends-701c01560b7

https://www.pppl.gov/news/2019/04/artificial-intelligence-accelerates-efforts-develop-clean-virtually-limitless-fusion

https://hyper.is/blog

Advertisements

Adding some teeth to your server…

ever wonder how administrators of high value target technology (HVTT) users (aka Enterprises) fend off their attackers?

Helpful tools, like Denyhosts, Fail2Ban, and others help streamline the management and security of the systems they are responsible for

https://serverfault.com/questions/128962/denyhosts-vs-fail2ban-vs-iptables-best-way-to-prevent-brute-force-logons/632254#632254  

A combination of DenyHosts, fail2ban and creating your own server that you perform post-log-inspection on and update a database of the output of fail2ban and denyhosts. As well as using firewalls properly, as per Marcus Ramen’s original creation of the “firewall”. Deny All, Trust few, Filter everyone, Advanced Port Wizardry (ie. Port Knocking, which is actually listed in the thread above and I am not able to upvote it at this time. So I thought I would add some insights.

Using a tool such as SNORT https://www.snort.org/ and since you’re using Python/C/ASM (OPS aka Optimal Programming Stack) and being a Pragmatic Programmer #pragmaticprogrammer you have a broad range of skills, abilities with a pro-active preventative style where you enjoy planning ahead for future flexibility of your scalability. see Pythonic Styles like the Zen of Python.

.DEC
I love the Zen of Python.

https://www.python.org/dev/peps/pep-0020/

The Zen of Python

Beautiful is better than ugly.
Explicit is better than implicit.
Simple is better than complex.
Complex is better than complicated.
Flat is better than nested.
Sparse is better than dense.
Readability counts.
Special cases aren’t special enough to break the rules.
Although practicality beats purity.
Errors should never pass silently.
Unless explicitly silenced.
In the face of ambiguity, refuse the temptation to guess.
There should be one– and preferably only one –obvious way to do it.
Although that way may not be obvious at first unless you’re Dutch.
Now is better than never.
Although never is often better than right now.
If the implementation is hard to explain, it’s a bad idea.
If the implementation is easy to explain, it may be a good idea.
Namespaces are one honking great idea — let’s do more of those!


https://www.addictivetips.com/net-admin/intrusion-detection-tools/ (see excerpt below)

Security is a hot topic and it has been for quite a while. Many years ago, viruses were the only concerns of system administrators. Viruses were so common that it led the way for an astounding range of virus prevention tools. Nowadays, barely anyone would think of running an unprotected computer. However, computer intrusion, or the unauthorized access to your data by malicious users, is the “threat du jour”. Networks have become the target of numerous ill-intentioned hackers which will go to great lengths to gain access to your data. Your best defense against these types of threats is an intrusion detection–or prevention–system. Today, we’re reviewing ten of the best free intrusion detection tools.

.DEC (More to come)

Mimblewimble: How a Stripped-Down Version of Bitcoin Could Improve… | Bitcoin Magazine

https://bitcoinmagazine.com/articles/mimblewimble-how-a-stripped-down-version-of-bitcoin-could-improve-privacy-fungibility-and-scalability-all-at-once-1471038001/

Older article from 2016

. dec

Open Source Business Model

is a phrase that has been thrown around at times and applies to many existing examples like RedHat, Cloudera and others.


If you’re thinking about starting a company, don’t let the tail wag the dog. Start with the question “how can I deliver value for customers” and work backward from that. Then piece together the open source components you’ll need for your ultimate solutions that deliver value and construct your software supply chain. At this point, you may decide, like Red Hat, that you want the benefits of collaborative development, or you may decide, like Cloudera, that you want at least some of that to be entirely under your control. The point is you can make that choice without the baggage of “let’s monetize ‘X’”. You’ll be much happier with your choice.

https://medium.com/@johnmark/open-source-business-models-considered-harmful-2e697256b1e3

Open Source Business Model, is discussed in a few places by a few authors and their position is that there is not one of “these” and I would suggest that their perspective is skewed by their pre-existing conditioning from their own experiences. I think there are many entrepreneurs that are working in and with Open Source in various ways.

Lots of interesting ideas none the less.

https://www.linux.com/blog/4-quadrants-open-source-entrepreneurship

Follow our affiliate link below:

Infrastructure planning: A professional’s perspective.

https://lethain.com/infrastructure-planning/

Will Larson’s Bio:

Will Larson

April 1, 2007.

Hi. I grew up in North Carolina, studied CS at Centre College in Kentucky, spent a year in Japan on the JET Program, and have been living in San Francisco since 2009 or so.

Since coming out here, I’ve gotten to work at some great companies, and some of them were even good when I worked there! Starting with Yahoo! BOSSDiggSocialCodeUber and now Stripe.

A long time ago, I also cofounded a really misguided iOS gaming startup with Luke Hatcher. We made thousands of dollars over six months, and spent the next six years trying to figure out how to stop paying taxes. It was a bit of a missed opportunity.

The very first iteration of Irrational Exuberance was created the summer after I graduated from college, and I’ve been publishing to it off and on since. Early on there was a heavy focus on Django, Python and Japan; lately it’s more about infrastructure, architecture and engineering management.

It’s hard to predict what it’ll look like in the future.

In his article, Will Larson (https://lethain.com/about/) discusses the complicated processes of “Infrastructure Planning” and communicates in a very clear and effective way, a lot of what is necessary for something very complex and simplifies it down to less details and less technical language for the lay person. I think his brilliance is in this. I hope I find a lot more of this as I surf the Internet.

Here’s a couple of opening paragraphs to give you a taste.

Technical infrastructure is never complete. System processes can always run with less overhead or be bin-packed onto fewer machines. Data can be retrieved more quickly and stored at a cheaper cost per terabyte. System design can broaden the gap between failure and user impact. Transport layers can be more secure.

The sheer variety of investable projects is overwhelming. There are always new technologies to adopt or finish adopting: Docker, Kubernetes, Envoy, GKE, HTTP/2, GraphQL, gRPC, Spark, Flink, Rust, Go, Elixir are just the beginning of your options. Add cloud vendor competition, and the rate of change is pretty staggering.

With such a broad problem domain filled with so many possible solutions, I’ve sometimes found it difficult to provide guidance for infrastructure teams to prioritize their work. Originally, I thought this was because I lacked depth in some facets, but I slowly came to realize it was equally difficult for the teams themselves to prioritize their own work: there were simply too many options.

Read more…

I think you will find his article a very solid source of information.

.dec

Follow our affiliate link below:

PolyglotPersistence

via PolyglotPersistence  (excerpt follows)

In 2006, my colleague Neal Ford coined the term Polyglot Programming, to express the idea that applications should be written in a mix of languages to take advantage of the fact that different languages are suitable for tackling different problems. Complex applications combine different types of problems, so picking the right language for the job may be more productive than trying to fit all aspects into a single language.

My programming career began in 1980, as a hobby growing up and an older brother mentoring me during his summer and holiday, etc. visits. Those are fond memories and I miss talking and being around him.  Just like I miss our Dad.

Aside from having a lengthy personal history of being at the keyboard or wielding a soldering iron and other various tools through elementary, into high school and through college to this day.

Being a polyglot with computer languages is rooted in my background designing and building actual hardware from the ground up. Yes, I am One of Those Guys. I Love to Tinker with Things. Love Life and The Adventures of Living.

.dec

Open Source is Taking Over the World Survey Says…

http://www.northbridge.com/open-source-taking-over-software-world-survey-says

It’s been recognized that software is eating the world,” said Michael Skok, general partner at North Bridge Venture Partners. “Our survey points to the fact that open source is eating the software world

Open Source does not suffer from intrinsic entropy of development that plagues Closed Source Systems.

Open Source has better chance of long term survival due to the concept of “forking” the code base.

Open Source is also “more democratic” than Closed Source Systems historically.

Many consultants and organizations love to cite market share.

Using an “Open Source Cooperative Business Model” is the foundation for future businesses.

https://open.coop/2018/04/03/making-of-the-coop-cloud/

  1. Freemium
  2. Low Cost
  3. Medium Cost
  4. High Cost

Features that are unique to the system and involve Human Intervention to program the Features are applied in stages or levels at each of the levels beyond 1: these other levels generate revenue and the community of cooperative member-owners vote on Features & Benefits that they would like to have in the System.

The Freemium Level will obviously come with the Seed Server which you purchase and receive the first 2 levels of Software.

Base Cost of Hardware (Seed Server) + $29.95 per month after the first year with option for annual renewal, $299.99 when included with the Server.

$2002.69  (Spec in development)

WIP (30/08/2018)

.dec